2160 books total

This book has 9 recommendations

Jack Ma (Founder/Alibaba)

According to a Yibada interview with Chen Wei, who wrote Ma’s 2014 authorized biography, the Alibaba founder and executive chairman always carries the Tao Te Ching, the foundational text of Taoist philosophy, religion and ethics composed by Lao Tzu in the sixth century B.C.

Jason Nemer (Founder/AcroYoga)

Jason travels with this book.

Jack Dorsey (CEO/Twitter)

Q: What are the books that had a major influence on you? Or simply the ones you like the most.

Jack Dorsey: Tao te Ching, score takes care of itself, between the world and me, the four agreements, the old man and the sea...I love reading!

Joel Gascoigne (Co-founder/Buffer)

Tao Te Ching is one of the most famous texts that exists for philosophical Taoism (along with Zhuangzi which I have also included below). This book follows a different format to other philosophical texts and is very easy to read. It is split up into 81 very brief chapters (some just a few words). It's one of the philosophy books which for me had a lot of impact in very few words. Tao Te Ching is one of the most famous texts that exists for philosophical Taoism (along with Zhuangzi which I have also included below). This book follows a different format to other philosophical texts and is very easy to read. It is split up into 81 very brief chapters (some just a few words). It's one of the philosophy books which for me had a lot of impact in very few words.

Bernard Tan (Founder/ReCactus)

The “Tao Te King” by Lao Tzu probably resonated with me the strongest, but others like the “Art of War” by Sun Tzu, “Bhagavad Gita” or Zen Buddhist scriptures were also real eye-openers, even for a non-religious person like myself.

Adam Haritan (Founder/Learn Your Land)

In Stephen Mitchell’s translation of the Tao Te Ching, he writes in verse 74: “If you realize that all things change, there is nothing you will try to hold onto.” I had never heard such wisdom whenever I first encountered those words, and as soon as I absorbed that verse and put it into practice, my life improved quite significantly. I realized that I was holding onto many things that no longer served me — including relationships, jobs, material possessions, ideas, etc. — and by letting go of these things, or least not feeling the need to be attached to them, I was able to lessen the load of struggle in my life. I learned that just because something worked for me in the past, that didn’t mean it would continue to serve my highest purpose moving forward in life. I had to be okay with change, and more importantly, I had to be okay with letting things go.

Austin Kleon (Writer, artist)

Every one of these poems reads like a subtweet of the president. Le Guin’s footnotes are great, too: In response to “having a lot of things, a lot of money: / shameless theives. / Surely their way / isn’t the way,” she writes, “So much for capitalism.”)

Tim O'Reilly (Founder/O'Reilly Media)

The Way of Life According to Lao Tzu (Tao Te Ching), translated by Witter Bynner. My personal religious philosophy, stressing the rightness of what is, if only we can accept it. Most people who know me have heard me quote from this book. "Seeing as how nothing is outside the vast, wide-meshed net of heaven, who is there to say just how it is cast?"

Naval Ravikant (CEO & Co-Founder/AngelList)

In the philosophy side, I’ve been rereading the Tao Te Ching.

Amazon description

The Tao Teh King (Tao Te Ching) forms the fundamental core of modern Taoist philosophy and has informed the beliefs and mode of life of the people of China for 2500 years. For all those who seek peace, contentment, harmony and balance in life, the Tao Teh King is an indispensable resource. Lao Tse’s words speak directly to the heart with simple, direct and profound wisdom addressing the core principles of the art of living well. The translation and commentary presented here was completed between 1921 and 1923 and serialized in the periodical magazine The Theosophical Quarterly.

The society responsible for the periodical was dissolved some fifteen years later, leaving this translation to lay dormant these many years. It is reproduced verbatim, but with an adjustment in formatting—providing the translation itself, in whole, prior to the commentary—the addition of a foreword, and of additional notes. Charles Johnston's article on the Religion of China, reproduced in this volume, demonstrates the depth of his understanding not only of Ancient China and its religious life, but of its place in the larger context of human religious thought. This wider contextual grasp lends itself to a much more expansive commentary upon the Tao Teh King than we commonly find, as Johnston is able to draw many parallels to other world-teachings, some of which the student may be more intimately familiar.

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See more books recommended by: Jack Ma, Jason Nemer, Jack Dorsey, Joel Gascoigne, Bernard Tan, Adam Haritan, Austin Kleon, Tim O'Reilly, Naval Ravikant

See more books written by: Lao Tzu

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